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Help with 6.5 rifle choice

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Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2016, 05:04:38 PM »
 

Jeff M

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I appreciate everyone's comments and suggestions and have placed a bid on an RPR in 6.5 creedmoor. 

I realize there can be some inherent flaws with a mass-produced rifle I may experience going this route, but it will get me into competitions very inexpensively and once I learn the games and what I actually need and want in a custom or semi custom distance rifle, I will have a couple of years of actual experience under my belt so I can then make an informed decision.  :)

It's been my experience that if you end up liking the game, you won't wait a couple of years to build a custom.


Denverdave - my gripe with the rpr as a "growth" platform is pretty much the same as you found with savage - not much aftermarket support.  Sure, guys like Chad are doing barrels for them, but they aren't any less expensive than a barrel for a 700 clone/custom.  Then there's the lack of chassis options, the lack of aftermarket triggers (I know timney just released one, but are there any others?), and the fact that it's still a factory mass produced action when you're finished.  Thus, my recommendation to buy one and keep it stock, save any money you might sink into upgrades to put towards a build.  They are a great starter platform, and are capable the way they ship - especially at the price point they are selling for.  They just don't grow well due to limited choices for said growth, IMO.


I think you have a good point. I would argue that the aftermarket for the RPR will grow rapidly. I have seen a handful of new aftermarket barrel options come to market in just the past few months I have been "following " the RPR. But, I do agree, as a stock gun, for the money it's a winner.

Maybe you can shed a little light on this for me... you mentioned that there are not chassis options. Do you feel that there is a need for that?

I am new to the long range game. Wanted to buy a RPR in May and could not find one. Impatient and prone to instant gratification I came across a Savage model 10T in 6.5CM on sale for $500ish at Cabellas.  Pulled the trigger on that. Shot it once or twice, realized the Accu-Stock had to go (no surprise) and dropped it into a XLR Element. It's taken me some time to get familiar with the platform (first bolt gun), and tinkering with this and that to get it to shoot well (and me to learn how to shoot it).  Now It's a sub MOA rifle with factory ammo. I shoot steel every weekend out to 1k yards. Sometimes, due to my inexperience with wind the 900 and 1k targets get away but I almost always have first shot hits 400-700.

Sorry, kinda went off on a tangent there. Back to the RPR, a couple months after I got my Savage my buddy got a RPR. I shoot with this guy every weekend.  Had a good amount of time behind the RPR. While both my Savage and his RPR shoot about the same the RPR is a clear winner in terms of features and refinement.  I have heard other people talk about replacing the chassis on the RPR, as you have mentioned.  Judging from my experience with the rifle that's the last thing I would think about changing. Any insight would be appreciated.

To the OP: good luck with the auction. If you don't win check back often.  It's worth the wait.


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Stocks/chassis are personal decisions.  I, myself, have J Allen chassis on my rifles.  Prior to discovering those, I used AICS folders.  Many guys prefer Manners, some prefer CADEX, and still others like whatever they've got.  The choices are endless.

There are several shortcomings with the rpr chassis, in my mind at least.  However, these shortcomings are only recognized through the eyes of experience.  It's one of those "don't know what you're missing" type of things, I guess.  If you've never spent time behind a rifle that has those other features, you likely wouldn't even think they should be there.  Just small stuff.  But due to the way the rpr is designed with the bolt and such, I'm not sure a replacement chassis would even be feasible.  Hell, I'm not even sure if you can remove the action.  For all I know, it's bonded to the chassis like an AI.  But again - and I can't stress this enough - in their stock form, straight from the box - they are capable.  I suppose it's akin to saying that you can go buy a Hellcat and tear up the dragstrip, but if you want an 8 second car, you're better off building a $150k race car than you are sinking another $75k into a Hellcat.
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Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2016, 04:04:37 AM »
 

montigre

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I suppose it's akin to saying that you can go buy a Hellcat and tear up the dragstrip, but if you want an 8 second car, you're better off building a $150k race car than you are sinking another $75k into a Hellcat.

Agreed, but it is my understanding that the RPR  was not introduced for those who can or wish to purchase an 8-second car.  It is designed and marketed for the novices who wish to try out their legs in the longer distance games without having to purchase a $$$ custom something on hearsay that may end up not fitting their physique or shooting goals. 

I agree that while the RPR is probably going to be pretty good with PRS types of shoots, it is not going to make a very good benchrest rifle and probably may only be a marginally good f-class platform, but it should allow me and others to at least get a feel for these types of events without breaking the bank and to formulate our opinions on exactly what features we may need or want in a custom or semi-custom rifle when the time to upgrade comes along. 

It is very good that so many more people will be able to get into the shooting sports because of this offering.  :)
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2016, 09:38:44 PM »
 

Jeff M

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I suppose it's akin to saying that you can go buy a Hellcat and tear up the dragstrip, but if you want an 8 second car, you're better off building a $150k race car than you are sinking another $75k into a Hellcat.

Agreed, but it is my understanding that the RPR  was not introduced for those who can or wish to purchase an 8-second car.  It is designed and marketed for the novices who wish to try out their legs in the longer distance games without having to purchase a $$$ custom something on hearsay that may end up not fitting their physique or shooting goals. 

I agree that while the RPR is probably going to be pretty good with PRS types of shoots, it is not going to make a very good benchrest rifle and probably may only be a marginally good f-class platform, but it should allow me and others to at least get a feel for these types of events without breaking the bank and to formulate our opinions on exactly what features we may need or want in a custom or semi-custom rifle when the time to upgrade comes along. 

It is very good that so many more people will be able to get into the shooting sports because of this offering.  :)

No, I agree.  Perhaps my metaphor was poor.  If you want to go to the dragstrip and do pretty well, a hellcat will be a good choice for getting a fast car at a reasonable price.  But once you decide you're hooked, you're better off selling the hellcat and building a racecar than you are sinking another $75k into the hellcat (in addition to the cost of buying the hellcat, that is!)

Same with the rpr - it'll be great to get started, and allow you to determine if you like the game and want to continue with it.  If you decide you do, my opinion is that you would be better served by having something built to your specs - caliber, action, chassis, etc.  Get behind a bunch of stuff, decide what fits you and your budget.

I don't speak without some bit of experience on this, either - prior to my custom, I had a 700.  I replaced the stock.  I replaced the trigger.  Put a can on it.  Expensive base, expensive scope, expensive rings, etc.  But when I was done, it was still just a 700.  I sunk a bunch of money into a hellcat, trying to make it a racecar.  If I had it to do over, I'd have skipped all that crap, and once I decided I was in, I would have sold the bone stock hellcat and built a racecar.

Hope that clears it up.   Post pics of your rpr when you get it, and make sure to get out to a match!!
« Last Edit: October 27, 2016, 09:40:24 PM by Jeff M »
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Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #18 on: October 28, 2016, 02:07:41 AM »
 

DenverDave

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Stocks/chassis are personal decisions.  I, myself, have J Allen chassis on my rifles.  Prior to discovering those, I used AICS folders.  Many guys prefer Manners, some prefer CADEX, and still others like whatever they've got.  The choices are endless.

There are several shortcomings with the rpr chassis, in my mind at least.  However, these shortcomings are only recognized through the eyes of experience.  It's one of those "don't know what you're missing" type of things, I guess.  If you've never spent time behind a rifle that has those other features, you likely wouldn't even think they should be there.  Just small stuff.  But due to the way the rpr is designed with the bolt and such, I'm not sure a replacement chassis would even be feasible.  Hell, I'm not even sure if you can remove the action.  For all I know, it's bonded to the chassis like an AI.  But again - and I can't stress this enough - in their stock form, straight from the box - they are capable.  I suppose it's akin to saying that you can go buy a Hellcat and tear up the dragstrip, but if you want an 8 second car, you're better off building a $150k race car than you are sinking another $75k into a Hellcat.
[/quote]

I follow you. Good points.  Ignorance is bliss I suppose, at least for the benefit of my bank account.  In my minds eye I can see the digits evaporating as I think about my "race car".  I guess my financial situation and abundance of expensive hobbies often puts me on the slow bleed trajectory.  Also, I have found, when I am a novice with something all the technical know how that goes into building a "race car" can be overwhelming. Modifying the Hellcat, one component at a time is more manageable, easier to digest.  Personally I love modifying things and making frequent changes. Admittedly I am a bit of a sucker for the tacticool but growing out of it. I can't even begin to think about all the "upgrades" I made to my first AR-15.  Long term planning/saving has never been my forte. Smart? No. Product of being an impulsive youth? Hopefully.

To the OP- what's yours move going to be regarding optics?  Still thinking of using that Redfield? 


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« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 02:37:05 AM by DenverDave »
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #19 on: October 28, 2016, 06:24:29 AM »
 

montigre

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Jeff, Ah, I see.  Yes, I totally agree with you.  This is not a platform anyone who becomes really serious in this sport and desires to improve should plan on modifying--it's just going to get the job done at that level. It's just a door opener, sometimes hit a gong at 900, but when then need to focus on strings of long distance 10s comes into play it's time to put the $$ needed for the upgrades (barrel, trigger assembly, etc) for the RPR to accomplish the task to go into an account for a semi custom or custom rifle.  :)

Dave, No, the Redfield is too big and clumsy to be toting around in a PRS match, but would work for f class if that was all I wanted to do.  So I'm going to go with the Athlon Argos BTR 6-24 x 50 Direct Dial Side Focus Riflescope, 30mm, FFP, ATMR IR-MOA.  It is supposed to have glass quality comparable to Vortex, but since it is a new company, the cost is about 1/3. It's been getting really good reviews across the board.   
 

Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #20 on: October 28, 2016, 04:53:44 PM »
 

DenverDave

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Jeff, Ah, I see.  Yes, I totally agree with you.  This is not a platform anyone who becomes really serious in this sport and desires to improve should plan on modifying--it's just going to get the job done at that level. It's just a door opener, sometimes hit a gong at 900, but when then need to focus on strings of long distance 10s comes into play it's time to put the $$ needed for the upgrades (barrel, trigger assembly, etc) for the RPR to accomplish the task to go into an account for a semi custom or custom rifle.  :)

Dave, No, the Redfield is too big and clumsy to be toting around in a PRS match, but would work for f class if that was all I wanted to do.  So I'm going to go with the Athlon Argos BTR 6-24 x 50 Direct Dial Side Focus Riflescope, 30mm, FFP, ATMR IR-MOA.  It is supposed to have glass quality comparable to Vortex, but since it is a new company, the cost is about 1/3. It's been getting really good reviews across the board.

I have heard good thinks about the Athlon as well. In the price range, seems to be the go-to optic these days. Performance comparable to much pricier scopes, like the Vortex, as you mentioned. I am planning on getting one of the BTRs for my 6.5 Grendel gas gun. Either the 4-14 or 6-24. Haven't decided yet. Just checked Amazon and noticed the prices have gone down (on Amazon) by $50 and $60 off MSRP respectively. Was not expecting that.

I hope to hear your thoughts once your up and running.

I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 05:11:08 PM by DenverDave »
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2016, 05:53:50 PM »
 

montigre

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I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.

Yes, the Harris bipod was on my to get list, but I did not know there were other mounting options available.  Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B?  And if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system?  Also, would a QD add movement to the set up?

I use QDs for my archery stabilizers and scope housing mostly for ease of packing for travel, and do have to be mindful of the potential for movement.  So, would it be better not to use a QD for the rifle?  Seems like there is so much to learn all at once--can be daunting at times.... 
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2016, 10:18:59 AM »
 

Jeff M

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This place seems to have a 6.5cm rpr in stock:  http://www.bluecollarfirearms.com  they just posted on Facebook this morning.

As for a bipod, I really prefer Atlas over Harris.  The Atlas bipods can be used with the legs 45 degrees off vertical, and they also lock, allowing you to load them forward or back.  The Harris can only be used vertically, and will fold up flip you try to load it backwards.  These may seem like silly things right now, but when you start shooting barricades, they begin to matter.  The QD on the Atlas is also excellent, and very fast & easy to actuate.

I haven't seen one of the Athlon scopes yet.  I'd be interested to hear a review when you get it.
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Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2016, 12:46:14 AM »
 

DenverDave

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I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.

Yes, the Harris bipod was on my to get list, but I did not know there were other mounting options available.  Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B?  And if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system?  Also, would a QD add movement to the set up?

I use QDs for my archery stabilizers and scope housing mostly for ease of packing for travel, and do have to be mindful of the potential for movement.  So, would it be better not to use a QD for the rifle?  Seems like there is so much to learn all at once--can be daunting at times....

I agree. These decisions can be daunting.
 To address your questions:
1) Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B? - with the right hardware, both A/B should work equally well. The primary difference being A will add more height and weight to your Bipod and give you the option the go QD. Bear in mind, attaching/removing the Harris with its std. system is pretty simple and not very time consuming. You loosen the torque screw and pinch the jaws- Bipod comes on/off the sling swivel.

2) if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system? - This is kinda a tricky thing to figure out.  You could do one of three things:
A) order a couple different options from a company like Amazon (easy/cheap returns) and find the one that fits the best.  Send back the rest.
B) Go to a local shop that stocks multiple options for you to try before you buy.
C) look around on the web and see what is working for other forum users. Keep in mind your model, #18008 (gen2) has a different hand guard than the previous generation so you would need to find info specific to your model.  ( I recommend options 1A or 1B)
3) would a QD add movement to the set up? - if you go high - end = ADM/LaRue, no.  You are rolling the dice with the cheaper QD models.

I have never competed in PRS, so I can't speak to the necessary of having a QD bipod for that application.

The Atlas is, of corse, a great piece of kit. I own one in addition to my Harris. But at 3x times the price, do you get 3x the bipod? No I don't think so.

LaRue offers some good priced deals on Harris Bipods including their QD mount. This is an option to consider:
http://www.larue.com/harris-combos?sort=popular

Lastly, if you get a Harris you will want a model that swivels;for shooting off uneven surfaces.  Some of the LaRue options above include upgraded swivel adjustment devices (for a significant price jump) The stock one which comes with the Swivel model Harris sucks.  I use a T-Nuts swivel level upgrade for the Harris. Works great, easy to install and cost around $10.
http://t-nuts.com/index.php?cPath=73


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« Last Edit: October 30, 2016, 01:04:18 AM by DenverDave »
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2016, 09:48:03 PM »
 

Jeff M

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I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.

Yes, the Harris bipod was on my to get list, but I did not know there were other mounting options available.  Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B?  And if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system?  Also, would a QD add movement to the set up?

I use QDs for my archery stabilizers and scope housing mostly for ease of packing for travel, and do have to be mindful of the potential for movement.  So, would it be better not to use a QD for the rifle?  Seems like there is so much to learn all at once--can be daunting at times....

I agree. These decisions can be daunting.
 To address your questions:
1) Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B? - with the right hardware, both A/B should work equally well. The primary difference being A will add more height and weight to your Bipod and give you the option the go QD. Bear in mind, attaching/removing the Harris with its std. system is pretty simple and not very time consuming. You loosen the torque screw and pinch the jaws- Bipod comes on/off the sling swivel.

2) if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system? - This is kinda a tricky thing to figure out.  You could do one of three things:
A) order a couple different options from a company like Amazon (easy/cheap returns) and find the one that fits the best.  Send back the rest.
B) Go to a local shop that stocks multiple options for you to try before you buy.
C) look around on the web and see what is working for other forum users. Keep in mind your model, #18008 (gen2) has a different hand guard than the previous generation so you would need to find info specific to your model.  ( I recommend options 1A or 1B)
3) would a QD add movement to the set up? - if you go high - end = ADM/LaRue, no.  You are rolling the dice with the cheaper QD models.

I have never competed in PRS, so I can't speak to the necessary of having a QD bipod for that application.

The Atlas is, of corse, a great piece of kit. I own one in addition to my Harris. But at 3x times the price, do you get 3x the bipod? No I don't think so.

LaRue offers some good priced deals on Harris Bipods including their QD mount. This is an option to consider:
http://www.larue.com/harris-combos?sort=popular

Lastly, if you get a Harris you will want a model that swivels;for shooting off uneven surfaces.  Some of the LaRue options above include upgraded swivel adjustment devices (for a significant price jump) The stock one which comes with the Swivel model Harris sucks.  I use a T-Nuts swivel level upgrade for the Harris. Works great, easy to install and cost around $10.
http://t-nuts.com/index.php?cPath=73


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In competition, evaluating the value of a piece of gear isn't as straightforward as putting two things side by side and saying "geez, that's nice, but not 3x the cost nice".  You have to start by saying "which one will allow me the greatest flexibility and provide the best chance for extra points?".

Believe me when I tell you, 1 point can make or break you.  Huge.  1 point can literally be the difference between a win and a loss (depending on which side of the tie breaker you fall on).  1 point can be the difference between a 3-way tie for second, where they add up 2nd & 3rd place money, then split it three ways, vs getting paid a solo second.  1 point, in a tight leader board, can literally move you up 5 places.  It can be the difference we between getting paid and not getting paid.  If an Atlas can get you 1 more point, in my mind, you'd be a fool to not get it - regardless the $200 cost difference.  You can get that - and then some - back in literally one match.

Now, having said that, it is still up to YOU to make the determination of if that piece of gear will allow you the opportunity it to get more points.  The rest of your game might be so solid that it wouldn't help.  For me, the Atlas brings points on barricade stages.  And it's also the reason QD is important - you take it off the front of the rifle and put it all the way back, right in front of the mag well, and then you put the legs down at 45 degrees forward.  Now you can push into the barricade with the bipod legs to increase your stability. On a rooftop, you can put it on the butt of the rifle to support the back.  Or you can put them at a 45 degree back angle to grip the peak of the roof if it's wet and you find yourself sliding down - you can use the rifle as a sort of anchor to hold yourself up.  Or if a position calls for a bipod, but the legs are too tall in the down position, you can put them at 45 degrees to lower the rifle.  Or if you're shooting off of some type of a span barricade like a barrel or tires, and need the legs to be forward or back - you can do that.  All things a Harris cannot do, and none of which has to do with the quality of the construction of either unit. The biggest part about the QD is that it allows for the use of pic rail, so you can put it where you want it, instead of being locked into swivel stud locations, and it also allows for fast, easy removal if you made a mistake in how you planned to attack the stage, and now it's in the way and needs to come off fast - while you're on the clock. Or sometimes when you need to start a stage prone, then transition to a barricade like a shoot house window where having a bipod on gets in the way, and makes it harder to put the rifle through the small windows.  Shoot prone, drop it off & leave it on the ground.  Pick it up when the stage is done.  A Harris on a sling swivel can't do that.

But again - these are all things you need to figure out and decide.  Simply saying "yeah, it feels like a nice piece of gear, but it's not worth 3x the harris" is doing yourself a disservice.   To me, if it gets me 1 or 2 points per match more, then it's worth its weight in gold.

As for the list of shit that didn't get me any more points - that is long, and varied.  Most of it was sold off to someone who wanted to see if it would get them points, some of it is still for sale, and some of it is in the reloading room thrown in a box with other worthless nonsense.  Lol
« Last Edit: October 30, 2016, 09:52:36 PM by Jeff M »
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Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #25 on: October 30, 2016, 10:38:03 PM »
 

DenverDave

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I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.

Yes, the Harris bipod was on my to get list, but I did not know there were other mounting options available.  Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B?  And if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system?  Also, would a QD add movement to the set up?

I use QDs for my archery stabilizers and scope housing mostly for ease of packing for travel, and do have to be mindful of the potential for movement.  So, would it be better not to use a QD for the rifle?  Seems like there is so much to learn all at once--can be daunting at times....

I agree. These decisions can be daunting.
 To address your questions:
1) Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B? - with the right hardware, both A/B should work equally well. The primary difference being A will add more height and weight to your Bipod and give you the option the go QD. Bear in mind, attaching/removing the Harris with its std. system is pretty simple and not very time consuming. You loosen the torque screw and pinch the jaws- Bipod comes on/off the sling swivel.

2) if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system? - This is kinda a tricky thing to figure out.  You could do one of three things:
A) order a couple different options from a company like Amazon (easy/cheap returns) and find the one that fits the best.  Send back the rest.
B) Go to a local shop that stocks multiple options for you to try before you buy.
C) look around on the web and see what is working for other forum users. Keep in mind your model, #18008 (gen2) has a different hand guard than the previous generation so you would need to find info specific to your model.  ( I recommend options 1A or 1B)
3) would a QD add movement to the set up? - if you go high - end = ADM/LaRue, no.  You are rolling the dice with the cheaper QD models.

I have never competed in PRS, so I can't speak to the necessary of having a QD bipod for that application.

The Atlas is, of corse, a great piece of kit. I own one in addition to my Harris. But at 3x times the price, do you get 3x the bipod? No I don't think so.

LaRue offers some good priced deals on Harris Bipods including their QD mount. This is an option to consider:
http://www.larue.com/harris-combos?sort=popular

Lastly, if you get a Harris you will want a model that swivels;for shooting off uneven surfaces.  Some of the LaRue options above include upgraded swivel adjustment devices (for a significant price jump) The stock one which comes with the Swivel model Harris sucks.  I use a T-Nuts swivel level upgrade for the Harris. Works great, easy to install and cost around $10.
http://t-nuts.com/index.php?cPath=73


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

In competition, evaluating the value of a piece of gear isn't as straightforward as putting two things side by side and saying "geez, that's nice, but not 3x the cost nice".  You have to start by saying "which one will allow me the greatest flexibility and provide the best chance for extra points?".

Believe me when I tell you, 1 point can make or break you.  Huge.  1 point can literally be the difference between a win and a loss (depending on which side of the tie breaker you fall on).  1 point can be the difference between a 3-way tie for second, where they add up 2nd & 3rd place money, then split it three ways, vs getting paid a solo second.  1 point, in a tight leader board, can literally move you up 5 places.  It can be the difference we between getting paid and not getting paid.  If an Atlas can get you 1 more point, in my mind, you'd be a fool to not get it - regardless the $200 cost difference.  You can get that - and then some - back in literally one match.

Now, having said that, it is still up to YOU to make the determination of if that piece of gear will allow you the opportunity it to get more points.  The rest of your game might be so solid that it wouldn't help.  For me, the Atlas brings points on barricade stages.  And it's also the reason QD is important - you take it off the front of the rifle and put it all the way back, right in front of the mag well, and then you put the legs down at 45 degrees forward.  Now you can push into the barricade with the bipod legs to increase your stability. On a rooftop, you can put it on the butt of the rifle to support the back.  Or you can put them at a 45 degree back angle to grip the peak of the roof if it's wet and you find yourself sliding down - you can use the rifle as a sort of anchor to hold yourself up.  Or if a position calls for a bipod, but the legs are too tall in the down position, you can put them at 45 degrees to lower the rifle.  Or if you're shooting off of some type of a span barricade like a barrel or tires, and need the legs to be forward or back - you can do that.  All things a Harris cannot do, and none of which has to do with the quality of the construction of either unit. The biggest part about the QD is that it allows for the use of pic rail, so you can put it where you want it, instead of being locked into swivel stud locations, and it also allows for fast, easy removal if you made a mistake in how you planned to attack the stage, and now it's in the way and needs to come off fast - while you're on the clock. Or sometimes when you need to start a stage prone, then transition to a barricade like a shoot house window where having a bipod on gets in the way, and makes it harder to put the rifle through the small windows.  Shoot prone, drop it off & leave it on the ground.  Pick it up when the stage is done.  A Harris on a sling swivel can't do that.

But again - these are all things you need to figure out and decide.  Simply saying "yeah, it feels like a nice piece of gear, but it's not worth 3x the harris" is doing yourself a disservice.   To me, if it gets me 1 or 2 points per match more, then it's worth its weight in gold.

As for the list of shit that didn't get me any more points - that is long, and varied.  Most of it was sold off to someone who wanted to see if it would get them points, some of it is still for sale, and some of it is in the reloading room thrown in a box with other worthless nonsense.  Lol

I believe you have some very valid points. I own an atlas, as I mentioned, and I appreciate the education I I received form reading your post!  I don't compete. I am thinking of giving it a try but never have entered a competition. Thus, my point of view is based on my experience using my bipods (both Harris and Atlas) in the traditional fashion: in the prone and occasionally from a bench.  But that's to you I have some new tricks to try out!

I don't know if the OP intends of competing.  My assumption was maybe, down the road. Therefore I advised him the way I did.... for the time being, while he learning the ropes of long range shooting.  And keeping his budget low.

Speaking of high end versatile bipods, have you ever tried the Modular Evolution Bipod? Very similar to the atlas design but with a few more features and options.   Like doubling as a tripod adapter and interchangeable legs. Looks interesting.  And has received to rave reviews. One reviews comment that stuck with me was "I never though the Atlas could be surpassed until i tried the Evolution" (paraphrased)

http://www.evolutionbipod.com/

Lastly, one more piece of data to support that the Harris is still relevant in PRS. Is according the "What the Pro's Use" %76 of the top PRS shooters still use the Harris:

http://precisionrifleblog.com/2015/01/05/bipod/




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #26 on: October 31, 2016, 07:18:19 AM »
 

Jeff M

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I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.

Yes, the Harris bipod was on my to get list, but I did not know there were other mounting options available.  Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B?  And if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system?  Also, would a QD add movement to the set up?

I use QDs for my archery stabilizers and scope housing mostly for ease of packing for travel, and do have to be mindful of the potential for movement.  So, would it be better not to use a QD for the rifle?  Seems like there is so much to learn all at once--can be daunting at times....

I agree. These decisions can be daunting.
 To address your questions:
1) Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B? - with the right hardware, both A/B should work equally well. The primary difference being A will add more height and weight to your Bipod and give you the option the go QD. Bear in mind, attaching/removing the Harris with its std. system is pretty simple and not very time consuming. You loosen the torque screw and pinch the jaws- Bipod comes on/off the sling swivel.

2) if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system? - This is kinda a tricky thing to figure out.  You could do one of three things:
A) order a couple different options from a company like Amazon (easy/cheap returns) and find the one that fits the best.  Send back the rest.
B) Go to a local shop that stocks multiple options for you to try before you buy.
C) look around on the web and see what is working for other forum users. Keep in mind your model, #18008 (gen2) has a different hand guard than the previous generation so you would need to find info specific to your model.  ( I recommend options 1A or 1B)
3) would a QD add movement to the set up? - if you go high - end = ADM/LaRue, no.  You are rolling the dice with the cheaper QD models.

I have never competed in PRS, so I can't speak to the necessary of having a QD bipod for that application.

The Atlas is, of corse, a great piece of kit. I own one in addition to my Harris. But at 3x times the price, do you get 3x the bipod? No I don't think so.

LaRue offers some good priced deals on Harris Bipods including their QD mount. This is an option to consider:
http://www.larue.com/harris-combos?sort=popular

Lastly, if you get a Harris you will want a model that swivels;for shooting off uneven surfaces.  Some of the LaRue options above include upgraded swivel adjustment devices (for a significant price jump) The stock one which comes with the Swivel model Harris sucks.  I use a T-Nuts swivel level upgrade for the Harris. Works great, easy to install and cost around $10.
http://t-nuts.com/index.php?cPath=73


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

In competition, evaluating the value of a piece of gear isn't as straightforward as putting two things side by side and saying "geez, that's nice, but not 3x the cost nice".  You have to start by saying "which one will allow me the greatest flexibility and provide the best chance for extra points?".

Believe me when I tell you, 1 point can make or break you.  Huge.  1 point can literally be the difference between a win and a loss (depending on which side of the tie breaker you fall on).  1 point can be the difference between a 3-way tie for second, where they add up 2nd & 3rd place money, then split it three ways, vs getting paid a solo second.  1 point, in a tight leader board, can literally move you up 5 places.  It can be the difference we between getting paid and not getting paid.  If an Atlas can get you 1 more point, in my mind, you'd be a fool to not get it - regardless the $200 cost difference.  You can get that - and then some - back in literally one match.

Now, having said that, it is still up to YOU to make the determination of if that piece of gear will allow you the opportunity it to get more points.  The rest of your game might be so solid that it wouldn't help.  For me, the Atlas brings points on barricade stages.  And it's also the reason QD is important - you take it off the front of the rifle and put it all the way back, right in front of the mag well, and then you put the legs down at 45 degrees forward.  Now you can push into the barricade with the bipod legs to increase your stability. On a rooftop, you can put it on the butt of the rifle to support the back.  Or you can put them at a 45 degree back angle to grip the peak of the roof if it's wet and you find yourself sliding down - you can use the rifle as a sort of anchor to hold yourself up.  Or if a position calls for a bipod, but the legs are too tall in the down position, you can put them at 45 degrees to lower the rifle.  Or if you're shooting off of some type of a span barricade like a barrel or tires, and need the legs to be forward or back - you can do that.  All things a Harris cannot do, and none of which has to do with the quality of the construction of either unit. The biggest part about the QD is that it allows for the use of pic rail, so you can put it where you want it, instead of being locked into swivel stud locations, and it also allows for fast, easy removal if you made a mistake in how you planned to attack the stage, and now it's in the way and needs to come off fast - while you're on the clock. Or sometimes when you need to start a stage prone, then transition to a barricade like a shoot house window where having a bipod on gets in the way, and makes it harder to put the rifle through the small windows.  Shoot prone, drop it off & leave it on the ground.  Pick it up when the stage is done.  A Harris on a sling swivel can't do that.

But again - these are all things you need to figure out and decide.  Simply saying "yeah, it feels like a nice piece of gear, but it's not worth 3x the harris" is doing yourself a disservice.   To me, if it gets me 1 or 2 points per match more, then it's worth its weight in gold.

As for the list of shit that didn't get me any more points - that is long, and varied.  Most of it was sold off to someone who wanted to see if it would get them points, some of it is still for sale, and some of it is in the reloading room thrown in a box with other worthless nonsense.  Lol

I believe you have some very valid points. I own an atlas, as I mentioned, and I appreciate the education I I received form reading your post!  I don't compete. I am thinking of giving it a try but never have entered a competition. Thus, my point of view is based on my experience using my bipods (both Harris and Atlas) in the traditional fashion: in the prone and occasionally from a bench.  But that's to you I have some new tricks to try out!

I don't know if the OP intends of competing.  My assumption was maybe, down the road. Therefore I advised him the way I did.... for the time being, while he learning the ropes of long range shooting.  And keeping his budget low.

Speaking of high end versatile bipods, have you ever tried the Modular Evolution Bipod? Very similar to the atlas design but with a few more features and options.   Like doubling as a tripod adapter and interchangeable legs. Looks interesting.  And has received to rave reviews. One reviews comment that stuck with me was "I never though the Atlas could be surpassed until i tried the Evolution" (paraphrased)

http://www.evolutionbipod.com/

Lastly, one more piece of data to support that the Harris is still relevant in PRS. Is according the "What the Pro's Use" %76 of the top PRS shooters still use the Harris:

http://precisionrifleblog.com/2015/01/05/bipod/




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

My impression of the op is that he wants to compete - maybe down the road, yes.  Were it me, I'd get the Atlas for versatility, since it will afford more options for barricade stages.  Being that he hasn't competed yet, he likely doesn't have all the skills and positions built in his mind yet using a rifle without an Atlas, so I think it can help.

As for the guys who still use Harris - as I mentioned, it's an individual choice to use a specific piece of gear.  My point was to ensure you evaluate the gear with the proper frame of mind, not just the cost vs construction quality.

I know several pros who still use Harris, and most of them have been competing in rifle competitions for many years, since before the PRS came into existence.  They have other tricks they use, and other pieces of gear.  For example, Jim See carries three bipods with him - a standard Harris, a 36" Harris,  and a 36" moa precision bipod.  He wedges them behind his trigger guard, and attaches them to the buttstock of the rifle, all sorts of stuff.  There are many creative ways to use gear, and I see a new one at every match.  It's simply a matter of what you as an individual shooter are able to get the most points with.  If it's a Harris, then by all means, use it!  Again, I just wanted to convey the mindset for how to choose your gear.  It shouldn't matter if that gear is a bipod, or a stock, or a second bipod, or a tripod, or a pack, etc.  They can all serve multiple purposes.  Get creative, and get the points!


As for the bipod you linked to - I've never used it, but I've seen them.  The one thing that will keep me from ever using one was the following:  this past March, a group of us from the forum went down to the LRSE PRS match in KY.  It rained.  A lot.  There was a prone-ish stage that had your bipod on the peak of a small embankment, and you laying behind it, simulating shooting from a ditch, or similar.  The ground had zero grass or any other cover, so you just laid in mud.  It was VERY slippery, and more than one guy took a tumble.

In any event, there was a guy there with that bipod, with the fancy carbon fiber legs.  He dropped the bipod into the mud, went to set up, and started sliding down the hill.  He used his rifle as an anchor to try to pull himself back up, and broke one of the legs clean off.

Im sure they warrantied the bipod, and he got a free replacement (or at least I would hope so).   But the problem was, there were at least half a dozen more stages to go that day, and he had to complete them with no bipod.  So, evaluating gear construction is important too.  The best warranty in the world won't replace that piece of gear when you're miles from civilization and have to finish a match...   :(


Now, that was one example, and only one bipod.  I don't know what he had done with that bipod previously - used it as a hammer, whatever - maybe he weakened it himself somehow.  But since I already own like 4 Atlas bipods, and RRS makes a tripod adapter that is direct-mount to my chassis, it's not something I feel compelled to investigate further.  But again - I already have my setup, much like the way the pros are that already have their setup with a Harris.  :)
« Last Edit: October 31, 2016, 07:35:47 AM by Jeff M »
Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #27 on: October 31, 2016, 06:32:09 PM »
 

montigre

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I am sure you have already thought about this but I consider a good bipod to be essential. $100 Harris is a no brainer.  You will need an adapter to mount the Harris on the RPR. You can go one of two ways: A) get a pic rail adapter for the bipod. Your RPR's handgurd is keymod so you would mount the rail section (included ) to the 6 o'clock position on the handguard, mount the pic rail swivel stud adapter on the rail, on goes the Harris. Or B) get a keymod Bipod mount/adapter. Attach that at the 6 on your rail, Harris mounts directly. This option will be lighter weight and lower profile than option A. Cost of a bipod rail mount ranges from $10-100. QD versions from LaRue/ADM are obviously at the high end of the range. A keymod Bipod adapter should run you $20-$30. I would research these a bit, you don't want one that has any play in it. Solid mount is important.  Unfortunately not all KM rails are created equal. Some adapters and/or rails sections will  work well with one brand's handguard but not another.

Yes, the Harris bipod was on my to get list, but I did not know there were other mounting options available.  Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B?  And if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system?  Also, would a QD add movement to the set up?

I use QDs for my archery stabilizers and scope housing mostly for ease of packing for travel, and do have to be mindful of the potential for movement.  So, would it be better not to use a QD for the rifle?  Seems like there is so much to learn all at once--can be daunting at times....

I agree. These decisions can be daunting.
 To address your questions:
1) Which would provide the more secure attachment--option A or B? - with the right hardware, both A/B should work equally well. The primary difference being A will add more height and weight to your Bipod and give you the option the go QD. Bear in mind, attaching/removing the Harris with its std. system is pretty simple and not very time consuming. You loosen the torque screw and pinch the jaws- Bipod comes on/off the sling swivel.

2) if B, how does one determine if the Ruger's KM rails will work with another company's mounting system? - This is kinda a tricky thing to figure out.  You could do one of three things:
A) order a couple different options from a company like Amazon (easy/cheap returns) and find the one that fits the best.  Send back the rest.
B) Go to a local shop that stocks multiple options for you to try before you buy.
C) look around on the web and see what is working for other forum users. Keep in mind your model, #18008 (gen2) has a different hand guard than the previous generation so you would need to find info specific to your model.  ( I recommend options 1A or 1B)
3) would a QD add movement to the set up? - if you go high - end = ADM/LaRue, no.  You are rolling the dice with the cheaper QD models.

I have never competed in PRS, so I can't speak to the necessary of having a QD bipod for that application.

The Atlas is, of corse, a great piece of kit. I own one in addition to my Harris. But at 3x times the price, do you get 3x the bipod? No I don't think so.

LaRue offers some good priced deals on Harris Bipods including their QD mount. This is an option to consider:
http://www.larue.com/harris-combos?sort=popular

Lastly, if you get a Harris you will want a model that swivels;for shooting off uneven surfaces.  Some of the LaRue options above include upgraded swivel adjustment devices (for a significant price jump) The stock one which comes with the Swivel model Harris sucks.  I use a T-Nuts swivel level upgrade for the Harris. Works great, easy to install and cost around $10.
http://t-nuts.com/index.php?cPath=73


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

In competition, evaluating the value of a piece of gear isn't as straightforward as putting two things side by side and saying "geez, that's nice, but not 3x the cost nice".  You have to start by saying "which one will allow me the greatest flexibility and provide the best chance for extra points?".

Believe me when I tell you, 1 point can make or break you.  Huge.  1 point can literally be the difference between a win and a loss (depending on which side of the tie breaker you fall on).  1 point can be the difference between a 3-way tie for second, where they add up 2nd & 3rd place money, then split it three ways, vs getting paid a solo second.  1 point, in a tight leader board, can literally move you up 5 places.  It can be the difference we between getting paid and not getting paid.  If an Atlas can get you 1 more point, in my mind, you'd be a fool to not get it - regardless the $200 cost difference.  You can get that - and then some - back in literally one match.

Now, having said that, it is still up to YOU to make the determination of if that piece of gear will allow you the opportunity it to get more points.  The rest of your game might be so solid that it wouldn't help.  For me, the Atlas brings points on barricade stages.  And it's also the reason QD is important - you take it off the front of the rifle and put it all the way back, right in front of the mag well, and then you put the legs down at 45 degrees forward.  Now you can push into the barricade with the bipod legs to increase your stability. On a rooftop, you can put it on the butt of the rifle to support the back.  Or you can put them at a 45 degree back angle to grip the peak of the roof if it's wet and you find yourself sliding down - you can use the rifle as a sort of anchor to hold yourself up.  Or if a position calls for a bipod, but the legs are too tall in the down position, you can put them at 45 degrees to lower the rifle.  Or if you're shooting off of some type of a span barricade like a barrel or tires, and need the legs to be forward or back - you can do that.  All things a Harris cannot do, and none of which has to do with the quality of the construction of either unit. The biggest part about the QD is that it allows for the use of pic rail, so you can put it where you want it, instead of being locked into swivel stud locations, and it also allows for fast, easy removal if you made a mistake in how you planned to attack the stage, and now it's in the way and needs to come off fast - while you're on the clock. Or sometimes when you need to start a stage prone, then transition to a barricade like a shoot house window where having a bipod on gets in the way, and makes it harder to put the rifle through the small windows.  Shoot prone, drop it off & leave it on the ground.  Pick it up when the stage is done.  A Harris on a sling swivel can't do that.

But again - these are all things you need to figure out and decide.  Simply saying "yeah, it feels like a nice piece of gear, but it's not worth 3x the harris" is doing yourself a disservice.   To me, if it gets me 1 or 2 points per match more, then it's worth its weight in gold.

As for the list of shit that didn't get me any more points - that is long, and varied.  Most of it was sold off to someone who wanted to see if it would get them points, some of it is still for sale, and some of it is in the reloading room thrown in a box with other worthless nonsense.  Lol

I believe you have some very valid points. I own an atlas, as I mentioned, and I appreciate the education I I received form reading your post!  I don't compete. I am thinking of giving it a try but never have entered a competition. Thus, my point of view is based on my experience using my bipods (both Harris and Atlas) in the traditional fashion: in the prone and occasionally from a bench.  But that's to you I have some new tricks to try out!

I don't know if the OP intends of competing.  My assumption was maybe, down the road. Therefore I advised him the way I did.... for the time being, while he learning the ropes of long range shooting.  And keeping his budget low.

Speaking of high end versatile bipods, have you ever tried the Modular Evolution Bipod? Very similar to the atlas design but with a few more features and options.   Like doubling as a tripod adapter and interchangeable legs. Looks interesting.  And has received to rave reviews. One reviews comment that stuck with me was "I never though the Atlas could be surpassed until i tried the Evolution" (paraphrased)

http://www.evolutionbipod.com/

Lastly, one more piece of data to support that the Harris is still relevant in PRS. Is according the "What the Pro's Use" %76 of the top PRS shooters still use the Harris:

http://precisionrifleblog.com/2015/01/05/bipod/

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

My impression of the op is that he wants to compete - maybe down the road, yes.  Were it me, I'd get the Atlas for versatility, since it will afford more options for barricade stages.  Being that he hasn't competed yet, he likely doesn't have all the skills and positions built in his mind yet using a rifle without an Atlas, so I think it can help.

As for the guys who still use Harris - as I mentioned, it's an individual choice to use a specific piece of gear.  My point was to ensure you evaluate the gear with the proper frame of mind, not just the cost vs construction quality.

I know several pros who still use Harris, and most of them have been competing in rifle competitions for many years, since before the PRS came into existence.  They have other tricks they use, and other pieces of gear.  For example, Jim See carries three bipods with him - a standard Harris, a 36" Harris,  and a 36" moa precision bipod.  He wedges them behind his trigger guard, and attaches them to the buttstock of the rifle, all sorts of stuff.  There are many creative ways to use gear, and I see a new one at every match.  It's simply a matter of what you as an individual shooter are able to get the most points with.  If it's a Harris, then by all means, use it!  Again, I just wanted to convey the mindset for how to choose your gear.  It shouldn't matter if that gear is a bipod, or a stock, or a second bipod, or a tripod, or a pack, etc.  They can all serve multiple purposes.  Get creative, and get the points!

As for the bipod you linked to - I've never used it, but I've seen them.  The one thing that will keep me from ever using one was the following:  this past March, a group of us from the forum went down to the LRSE PRS match in KY.  It rained.  A lot.  There was a prone-ish stage that had your bipod on the peak of a small embankment, and you laying behind it, simulating shooting from a ditch, or similar.  The ground had zero grass or any other cover, so you just laid in mud.  It was VERY slippery, and more than one guy took a tumble.

In any event, there was a guy there with that bipod, with the fancy carbon fiber legs.  He dropped the bipod into the mud, went to set up, and started sliding down the hill.  He used his rifle as an anchor to try to pull himself back up, and broke one of the legs clean off.

Im sure they warrantied the bipod, and he got a free replacement (or at least I would hope so).   But the problem was, there were at least half a dozen more stages to go that day, and he had to complete them with no bipod.  So, evaluating gear construction is important too.  The best warranty in the world won't replace that piece of gear when you're miles from civilization and have to finish a match...   :(

Now, that was one example, and only one bipod.  I don't know what he had done with that bipod previously - used it as a hammer, whatever - maybe he weakened it himself somehow.  But since I already own like 4 Atlas bipods, and RRS makes a tripod adapter that is direct-mount to my chassis, it's not something I feel compelled to investigate further.  But again - I already have my setup, much like the way the pros are that already have their setup with a Harris.  :)

You're right, I have not yet competed, but that is what my intentions are.  For the past decade I've competed very seriously in field archery and have garnered several state and regional wins and a couple of national top tens, so I can fully agree that one point can either have you standing on the podium or packing up and making plans for the next year's competition.  I also agree that once you reach a certain level, it behooves the competitor to get the absolute best equipment they can as that would be one less thing the competitor will have to worry about during the shoot. One thing I have learned over the years is that confidence in one's equipment is paramount for competitive success.

However, right now I am putting together an entry level platform to get my feet wet and learn the fundamentals of the games I wish to compete in and have to keep that in mind so that I do not end up with a $1200 beginner's rifle sporting $4500 of top of the line accessories.  What's that old saying about lipstick on a pig...?  If in a year or so I am achieving consistent scores, this rifle will become a practice gun and I will set out to purchase the kit that will enhance my shooting and will allow me to move up and take on greater challenges (if I do my part, of course). 

That being said, I do like the features of the basic Atlas over the Harris and feel it would not be too much of a stretch to add it to my gear and remain within my goal of creating a sound novice competition package. I also wish to thank both of you for a very educational thread that has been a great help to me.  Oh yeah, I'm a lady..... 8)     
 

Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2016, 09:19:46 PM »
 

DenverDave

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Happy to have helped. I am sure you will be happy with your gear and have lots of fun shooting!

Jeff- I have heard about the carbon legs breaking on the Evolution Bipod. Your story- although unique don't know if the designers imagined the bipod would be used for self arrest, is not the only instance of the carbon legs breaking I have heard. One of the reasons I chose the Atlas PSR over the evolution.  I did notice on their website they now offer aluminum legs as an alternative to the carbon fiber.

Good chatting with you guys and lady . I defiantly learned a few things and thank you all for the knowledge. I always appreciate the insight I get from experienced shooters.


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Re: Help with 6.5 rifle choice
« Reply #29 on: November 02, 2016, 02:41:17 PM »
 

montigre

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I am getting excited, the scope, mounting rings, and sling arrived today.  Rifle just shipped, so I should have it the beginning of next week.  Then, just the bipod and ammo remain, but I can get started using my bags and the ammo usually ships in just a couple of days.  Hopefully the weather will hold out for me to get it all put together.   :D

Then the newb questions will really start.....