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When to anneal...

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When to anneal...
« on: February 04, 2016, 09:46:27 PM »
 

OBGCK_4c

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Do you anneal before or after running your brass through a sizing die?

Do you anneal every 2 or 3 firing?
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Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2016, 11:28:20 PM »
 

6.5 Minnesota

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Anneal before sizing. I have been annealing every 3rd firing for the last couple years and it is working out really well for me.
 

Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2016, 08:26:06 AM »
 

Kanem

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I anneal after every firing clean anneal size
 

Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 09:07:16 AM »
 

Jeff M

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I anneal after every firing clean anneal size


This
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Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2016, 04:50:37 PM »
 

OBGCK_4c

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I asked b/c the other day I was wet tumbling some brass, and thought to myself "what if I anneal prior to sizing to expedite the process of drying the brass".... Two birds one stone kinda thing.


That being said, I follow the same procedure you guys got going on.
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Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 05:13:41 PM »
 

Jeff M

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I've thought about annealing while the brass is still "wet", but decided against it. Now, I don't have the equipment to MEASURE this, but logically, scientifically, it makes sense:

The goal of annealing is to heat the brass.
The goal of reloading is consistency.
Ergo, I anneal on a machine that holds every piece of brass at the same location in the flame for the same amount of time.

Now - water has a VERY high specific heat.
Specific heat is the amount of heat per unit mass required to raise the temperature by one degree Celsius.  To give you an idea of exactly HOW high the specific heat of water is:




So - by my logic (and science, if you had sensitive enough equipment to measure it), the water that's in/on those cases will absorb enough heat from the flame that you will not fully anneal your brass - or, at least, not every piece will be annealed CONSISTENTLY because no two pieces of brass will have exactly the same amount of water in/on them.

Maybe that's the engineer in me being too analytical, but it makes perfect sense to me.  So I just suffer, and let the brass sit on a towel overnight.  It's dry by morning.


One thing I've noticed about wet tumbling - the mouths of the cases get kind of banged up.  Not dented or anything, but the mouth itself (not the whole neck) is a little thinner due to chamfer/debur.  So when they go into the tumbler, I'm finding that the case mouth gets "rolled", I guess?  The thinner part of the mouth gets knocked down, so that the mouth is thicker after stainless tumbling.

The chambers in my Beanland 6.5x47 barrels have been JUST tight enough to give me chambering issues if I don't chamfer every damn time.

Anyone else having that issue?  I'm still trying to sort out exact what my order of operations should be.

Currently:
Deprime
Stainless tumble
264 mandrel (brings the mouths back to round because some get dinged up in the rocks, my bag, etc) 
Anneal
Size (Redding bushing full length, no expander ball)
Polish
Chamfer
Prime
Load

I'm not sure if I'm quite happy with that process.   Opinions?
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 05:23:28 PM by Jeff M »
Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 

Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2016, 04:10:57 PM »
 

DarksideSix

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Keye,

I anneal before cleaning otherwise if I anneal clean brass and it sits for a few days it gets a real bluing tint to it (not like that's a big deal).

I anneal, clean, then resize.  I anneal after every third firing.
 

Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2016, 06:44:54 PM »
 

M54

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I de-prime, clean, anneal,size,trim,chamfer-deburr, prime, load and seat.
 

Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2016, 04:00:12 PM »
 

OBGCK_4c

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Appreciate the feedback gents👍
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Re: When to anneal...
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2016, 12:00:04 PM »
 

DocUSMCretired

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I will throw a curve ball in here. While I cannot openly share the results of the testing, I highly recommend picking up Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting. Some chapters cover Advanced Reloading Techniques, including annealing, and the Lab Results on annealing are well worth the read. Probably not what most expect. It will answer this question for you.
Doc Beech - Applied Ballistics doc.beech@appliedballisticsllc.com
(www.abmediaresources.com - User Guides, Articles, Resources, Downloads.) -- ( Applied Ballistics Website.)