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Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others

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Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2016, 12:21:25 PM »
 

sp01jjones

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Mental Mistake from the deepest darkest reaches of Hades....

So....
I shot Woody's Spring PRS Match like I was blind and stupid. Not even blaming the wind or shivering in the cold. Just could not hit targets! So when I got home, I started double checking everything in preparation for the Kestrel Precision Match at Peacemaker this weekend. Well, some really stupid person fat fingered the velocity when they entered data into the ballistic calculator throwing their newly printed DOPE charts completely off and didn't catch that the charts were different from the master copies.

Yes, I feel like an IDIOT!

Lesson Learned .... DOUBLE CHECK EVERYTHING....

Did something very similar at the Peacemaker match. We shot the long target stage as our first stage of the whole match. Targets were from 900-1200ish. Hardly anyone was making hits due to shifting winds and size of targets. I got up there and decided I would hold off like I always do. My hold was about 1.3 mils roughly at the time. It was a strictly prone stage with lots of time. Seeing impacts was hard due to the rain the night before.

I fired a couple with nothing to show. I finally saw I was impacting low. Instead off adding 2 or 3 tenths on my dial I decided to hold into space. Not only was I battlying winds but also a mistake in dope. I normally don't have dope issues and looking back I should have added the .3 mils and rocked on but you live and learn. Fired about 15 shots at target 1 (like about 80% of everyone else) without making a hit.

The problem arose from somehow in my AB software my temperature defaulted to 0 which it never did before. Even thoguh I use DA that difference from 0 to 60 degrees was my .3 mils. Not sure why it happened and I usually have a paper backup dope card but I didn't catch it.

Looking back I should have taken my time and adjusted my scope. Probably should have dialed a ballpark wind call to keep myself closer to center. I normally don't run like this and just hold wind but it was a slow and precise stage from the prone with plenty of time. The guys that had a few hits all took their time.

Also its hard to start a match with a zero but you have to keep your head up high. It was hard for everyone and don't think for a second other squads are doing better than you. I made a good turnaround and only dropped 6 or 7 targets out of roughly 80 on the second day.
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2016, 08:27:24 AM »
 

Roddy

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I shot my first match. What a blast! I learned a lot.

While not exactly a mistake I noticed something that really jammed up a lot of shooters: Make sure you can run your bolt smoothly and quickly while maintaining a cheek weld.

I saw a lot of shooters who would take their head off the rifle or even the rifle out of the shoulder to run the bolt. Some had sticky bolts, some had feeding issues, some had small bolt handles and 90 degree throws (especially factory Remington 700's), but I think the biggest problem was a lot of people never practiced running their bolt quickly. Especially from awkward positions.

I am very new at this but that is just something I think a lot of people overlooked.

Something I failed to a do a few times was to make a game plan for different positions. Many times I put my right knee down when I should have had it up to support my right elbow when shooting with the forend supported. Should have thought it out beforehand a bit better.

I hope that helps somebody!
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2016, 12:13:33 PM »
 

Jeff M

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An excellent point, and something that I see many shooters - especially new shooters - doing; picking up their head to run the bolt.

Another similar "offense" is when shooting prone, you should be able to run the bolt with one hand.  Too many times have I seen a shooter take their support hand off the rear bag and grab the rifle when running the bolt.  Huge time waster.

As for the knee thing..   Guilty.   I've made a conscious effort to improve on it, but it really does take some work.  It seems to me that the natural tendency when getting down on one knee, for whatever reason, is to put the strong-side knee down.  When shooting, you want the opposite.  There's a pic of me shooting the grind last year with a pump pillow on my right elbow, just floating in space because my right knee was down.  I saw that pic and was mortified, and vowed right there to work on it.  It's helpful if you run through the stage in your mind several times prior to actually shooting it.
Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2017, 08:40:34 AM »
 

Extortion

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1)  Know your equipment.  Everything from the gun, to the bipod, to the scope and mount.  Not to mention your kestrel and rear bags.  Know how to work it in and out.  If it's mechanical know how to fix it in a field expedient manner.

2)  Know how to field strip your rifle.  That means taking down your bolt, in the field, between stages if you start to experience malfunctions.

3) Know your weaknesses.  Minimize them in competition.  Improve upon them in practice.

4) Know your strengths.  Exploit them in competition, maintain them in practice.
It pays to be a winner.
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2017, 06:45:57 PM »
 

Jeff M

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1)  Know your equipment.  Everything from the gun, to the bipod, to the scope and mount.  Not to mention your kestrel and rear bags.  Know how to work it in and out.  If it's mechanical know how to fix it in a field expedient manner.

2)  Know how to field strip your rifle.  That means taking down your bolt, in the field, between stages if you start to experience malfunctions.

3) Know your weaknesses.  Minimize them in competition.  Improve upon them in practice.

4) Know your strengths.  Exploit them in competition, maintain them in practice.

Excellent advice right there.
Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2017, 06:50:12 PM »
 

Extortion

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1)  Know your equipment.  Everything from the gun, to the bipod, to the scope and mount.  Not to mention your kestrel and rear bags.  Know how to work it in and out.  If it's mechanical know how to fix it in a field expedient manner.

2)  Know how to field strip your rifle.  That means taking down your bolt, in the field, between stages if you start to experience malfunctions.

3) Know your weaknesses.  Minimize them in competition.  Improve upon them in practice.

4) Know your strengths.  Exploit them in competition, maintain them in practice.

Excellent advice right there.


Shoot an AI and most of those things will take care of themselves.  Right Jeff? ;)


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It pays to be a winner.
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2017, 05:15:18 PM »
 

Jeff M

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1)  Know your equipment.  Everything from the gun, to the bipod, to the scope and mount.  Not to mention your kestrel and rear bags.  Know how to work it in and out.  If it's mechanical know how to fix it in a field expedient manner.

2)  Know how to field strip your rifle.  That means taking down your bolt, in the field, between stages if you start to experience malfunctions.

3) Know your weaknesses.  Minimize them in competition.  Improve upon them in practice.

4) Know your strengths.  Exploit them in competition, maintain them in practice.

Excellent advice right there.


Shoot an AI and most of those things will take care of themselves.  Right Jeff? ;)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I guess that depends on who you ask.  ;)
Every time you make a typo, the errorists win.
 

Re: Rookie Mistakes-Let's share for benefit of others
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2017, 07:38:36 AM »
 

Extortion

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I might actually run Amy's gun in Illinois just so I don't have to redo all my D.O.P.E for my AI just because Illinois suppressor laws suck.
It pays to be a winner.